Effects of Locally Manufactured Soaps on Some Selected Coloured Ghanaian Printed Cotton Fabrics

  • Seyram Ama DeiKumah Takoradi Technical University, Takoradi
  • Adwoa Tweneboaah Twum Takoradi Technical University, Takoradi
  • Jennifer Ama Aklamti Takoradi Technical University, Takoradi

Abstract

Despite the highly attractive and durable nature of most Ghanaian printed cotton fabrics, they tend to fade in colour faster over a short period of use due to poor laundry cultureand fabric care. This study was aimed at establishing the chemical composition and qualitystandards of key soap and ‘Azumah blow’ soap and to examine its effects on two locally- madeGhanaian cotton prints. The effects of two Ghanaian locally produced soaps (‘Key soap’ and ‘Azumah blow’) on thecolour of two Ghanaian printed cotton fabrics (GTP and ATL)were investigated using an experimental approach. Simple random sampling method wasused in selecting sample of 80 specimens from the two fabrics. The Gyro wash 315 andgeometric grey scale were used in washing and determining colour fastness  respectively.ANOVA was used to test the significant differences in the effects of the two soaps on thespecimens. ‘Azumah blow’ soap had higher total free alkali of 1.57% compared to thespecified maximum of 0.3% and higher percentage solubility in ethanol of 38.5% comparedto the 20% maximum specified standards, while those of key soap were consistent with theGhana Standard Board’s specified limits. There was a significant difference in the effect ofboth soaps on colour fastness of GTP and ATL cotton fabrics, with ‘Azumah blow’ having themost significant effect.

Published
Mar 17, 2017
How to Cite
DEIKUMAH, Seyram Ama; TWUM, Adwoa Tweneboaah; AKLAMTI, Jennifer Ama. Effects of Locally Manufactured Soaps on Some Selected Coloured Ghanaian Printed Cotton Fabrics. International Conference on Applied Science and Technology Conference Proceedings, [S.l.], v. 3, n. 1, p. 136 - 143, mar. 2017. ISSN 2467-902X. Available at: <https://conference.kstu.edu.gh/index.php/proceedings/article/view/15>. Date accessed: 20 june 2019.
Section
Creative and Applied Arts